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Will the rise of non-invasive surgery and nanopolymers effectively stick to biological tissues sound the death knell of surgical sutures? Not so sure, answer the actors of the sector, according to which the technologies should rather complement. Nose Jobs have been practiced since the beginning of time in Las Vegas. Are you looking to get one done? Check out this amazing clinic for the best surgeons at Rhinoplasty Las Vegas.

Will the rise of non-invasive surgery and nanopolymers effectively stick to biological tissues sound the death knell of surgical sutures? Not so sure, say the players in the sector, according to which the technologies should rather complement.

Proudly, Jean-Marc Chalot exhibits an ophthalmic suture from his company Péters Surgical, which is only a few decimal places in a millimeter, and yet is set by hand on the needle.

Based in Bobigny (Seine-Saint-Denis), Peters is the world’s fourth largest actor in surgical sutures, but far behind the US medical giants Ethicon and Medtronic as well as the German B. Braun, who dominate this global market valued at some $ 3 billion.

To differentiate, Peters relies on niche products rather than on large volumes, because “in a context of globalization we will never be the cheapest,” said Mr. Chalot, director general of the group since 2003.

The company focuses on sutures for cardiac and digestive surgery, two areas where the surgeon still has a say in the choice of his fundamental working tools, according to Chalot.

– Synthetic is king –

The sutures of natural origin are losing speed: catgut, made from animal casings, has long been common but was banned in surgery in Europe after the mad cow crisis. As for the use of certain textiles, mainly silk, it tends to be limited to a few niches such as ophthalmology or dental.

Synthetic materials now dominate the global market. “They are much easier to produce and less traumatic for patients, in the sense that there is less risk of allergies” thanks to their better biocompatibility, explains to AFP Cloé Péchon, responsible for the products sutures in B. Braun France.

In the vast panoply of sutures, one distinguishes especially the resorbable ones, by hydrolysis with the fluids of the body, and the non-resorbable, depending on whether the wires are destined to areas with fast or slow healing.

In spite of everything, “the suture remains a foreign body”, admits Mrs. Péchon. Hence the efforts of industrialists to go “towards glues and gels”, including in internal surgery.

“Before we said,” To large surgeons the big incisions “, but this is no longer true today,” says Michel Therin, general manager of Medtronic’s global pole of general surgery.

The new minimally invasive surgery technologies now make it possible to “save the incisions” by using micro-cameras, or through natural pathways such as arteries for vascular surgery, he said.

“To suture two blood vessels in order to make them watertight, you have to make very small stitches. A glue could have an important interest, brushing the surface,” he admitted.

– Alchemy of polymers –

Such surgical adhesives already exist. “But they are not always very easy to use” and may lack resistance or grip in wet conditions, he notes.

“The thread and the needle, it seems very basic but it is formidable efficiency,” insists Therin.

Instead, he sees the adhesives “completing the existing supply” of sutures in some applications as they become more efficient and economical.

The major actors in the sutures all have confidential projects on the subject. And follow the efforts of start-ups in search of the best alchemy of nano-polymers.

According to Christophe Bancel, managing director of the Paris-based young “medtech” Gecko Biomedical, the adhesives are “the growth axis” of the wound care market, which develops a gel that is supposed to tick all the boxes: biocompatible, biodegradable, hydrophobic, Adhesive and flexible.

This polymer is applied to the viscous state and then polymerizes “in a matter of seconds” by a luminous stimulus activated at a distance by the surgeon, explains Bancel.